Wednesday, 1 November 2017

Adie, Adie, Adie

Lilias Adie killed by the church
Dundee University has completed a remarkable project to recreate the face of one of Scotland's most notorious "witches" Lilias Adie of 18th century Fife..  Lilias Adie died in 1704 in prison before she could be burned for her "confessed" crimes of being a witch and having sex with the devil. Locals buried her under a large stone on the Fife coast, perhaps believing it would stop her rising from the grave.  Her remains were exhumed in the 19th Century by antiquarians. Her skull ended up in the St Andrews University Museum and was photographed before it went missing during the 20th Century.

Some papers and academics report that the real supposed "crime" that "witches" were sentenced for was as a "cause of illness and misfortune" in their local community - the church encouraged people to believe that the highly-selective "immoral" behaviour of targetted individuals was the cause of misfortune,  ill-health and death of "innocent church-going" members of the parish. The conduct of the church or its favoured flock was never under any question needless to say.

Locals in Havering might remember that Adie was the surname of the Deputy Headmaster who helped an Irish Fenian family get good jobs, they later joined the Romford Conservative Party and the Havering College scandal soon followed.  The Havering Witness Justice Campaign was established to call for a full criminal investigation into the orchestrated criminality scandal at the college - we believe that the current MP for Romford, Andrew Rosindell, has knowledge of these events as he was a student at the college himself at the time. Please read our mission statement.

Adie, from Torryburn, was summoned before local church ministers and elders in 1704 over claims she had brought ill-health to one of her neighbours. According to local folklore, she is said to have confessed that she had met the Devil in a local cornfield and then “accepted him as her lover and master”.

Read more at: http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/uni-recreates-face-of-one-of-scotland-s-most-notorious-witches-1-4600739
Torryburn, was summoned before local church ministers and elders in 1704 over claims she had brought ill-health to one of her neighbours. According to local folklore, she is said to have confessed that she had met the Devil in a local cornfield and then “accepted him as her lover and master”.

Read more at: http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/uni-recreates-face-of-one-of-scotland-s-most-notorious-witches-1-4600739
Read more at: http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/uni-recreates-face-of-one-of-scotland-s-most-notorious-witches-1-4600739
Adie, from Torryburn, was summoned before local church ministers and elders in 1704 over claims she had brought ill-health to one of her neighbours. According to local folklore, she is said to have confessed that she had met the Devil in a local cornfield and then “accepted him as her lover and master”.

Read more at: http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/uni-recreates-face-of-one-of-scotland-s-most-notorious-witches-1-4600739

 The Scotsman reports on face reconstruction of 18th century "witch" Lilias Adie

Chase Cross School Given Rotten Irish Apples by Conservative Party

Irish "fenian" family joined Romford Conservative Party - college scandal soon followed

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